Victory at CITES! Committee Votes to List the Silky Shark, Thresher Sharks, and Mobula Rays

We did it.  In a collective effort supported by numerous NGOs — and with the backing of several key nations — the committee tasked with considering species proposals voted today to recommend listing of silky sharks, thresher sharks, and mobula rays under CITES Appendix II.  While the committee’s recommendation could be overturned in the full plenary session tomorrow, we believe such an outcome is unlikely given the strong support for the listings.

Sea Shepherd Legal galvanized support in the days preceding this momentous occasion.  By relentlessly engaging delegates from all corners of the globe — and by hosting a packed side event — we did everything in our power to ensure this result.

Today’s developments stand in stark contrast to the position of the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), which recently found that the bigeye and common thresher do not warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  NMFS made a grave mistake in reaching this conclusion.  Along with several other groups, Sea Shepherd Legal has been working to win these sharks the ESA protections that they deserve.

This victory is only the beginning.  Much work remains to be accomplished.  We need to list more sharks and rays.  More importantly, we must push for immediate and effective implementation of these new listings, along with greater enforcement of existing domestic and regional conservation measures.

Today, we celebrate.  Tomorrow, we continue the fight.

img_3495

Silky shark.  Photo credit: Alex Hofford.

Sea Shepherd Legal Packs the House in Johannesburg, Calling for CITES Protections for Sharks, Rays, and Other Marine Species

In just a few days, the international community will have a rare opportunity to give sharks, rays, and other marine species a measure of the protection they deserve.  Early next week, the parties to CITES will decide whether to list the silky shark, all species of thresher sharks, all species of mobula rays, the bangaii cardinalfish, the clarion angelfish, and the nautilus.  If successful, these listings will create serious legal obstacles to unchecked international trade — trade that is pushing these species to the brink.  It’s not enough, but it’s a significant step in the right direction.

ssl-questions

Last night, Sea Shepherd Legal held a panel discussion, calling for parties to do the right thing by supporting the proposals in favor of greater protections for marine species.  Featuring a compelling presentation by a distinguished biologist and stirring endorsements by official delegates from Brazil and the Philippines, the event galvanized support ahead of next week’s critical votes.

Vaquita.jpg

The parties are informed.  The world is watching.  Should the CITES community fail to respond, they will have no excuses to offer.  Parties:  Do the right thing.  Vote “yes.”

 

Giving Teeth to Toothfish Protections: CITES Listing Is a Must

This is the third entry in a series live from CITES CoP 17 in Johannesburg, South Africa

Known as “white gold” among illegal fishermen, Patagonian and Antarctic toothfish can fetch as much as $US 83 million for the catch from a single vessel.  In the face of this lucrative market, toothfish populations have experienced precipitous declines throughout their range.  Some of the only protections against the overharvest of toothfish are provided by the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR or Convention).

Here’s the problem:  CCAMLR is legally binding on only a small fraction of the world’s nations.  CCAMLR boasts but 25 Members and 11 Acceding States.  That means that only 36 nations, or approximately 18% of the world’s countries, have agreed to bind themselves to CCAMLR’s conservation measures.

So what?, you might be thinking.  Not every nation targets toothfish.  As long as the fishing nations are bound to the Convention, who cares?  And the really bad guys — pirate ships, like the Thunder — ignore laws entirely.   

The second thought may be right.  Extreme scofflaws are only deterred by stiff enforcement, which is where Sea Shepherd vessels like the Sam Simon and Steve Irwin come into play.  But the first thought — that CCAMLR is good enough as far as the law is concerned — fails to account for the complexities of the problem.

news-150410-1-1-gg-matze-flag-line-pile-9s1a9133-1000w

The Sam Simon hauls in miles of illegal gillnet abandoned by the Thunder.

Unfortunately, CCAMLR does not cover all nations whose vessels ply the Southern Ocean for toothfish.  Over the past decade, a number of nations that are not CCAMLR signatories have reportedly flagged vessels identified as engaging in illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing in Convention waters.  Moreover, CCAMLR’s reach does not extend to the many nations that import toothfish in international trade.  These nations fuel the  burgeoning demand for toothfish in international trade.

Bottom line:  We have a slew of nations not bound by CCAMLR that either (A) flag vessels that harvest toothfish, or (B) import toothfish.

Enter CITES.  Where CCAMLR suffers from limited membership, CITES boasts a nearly universal membership.  Out of 196 nations, 183 are parties to CITES.

If toothfish were listed under CITES Appendix I, commercial trade between CITES parties (the vast majority of the world) would be banned.  If, more realistically, toothfish were listed under CITES Appendix II, commercial trade could still occur, but non-CCAMLR states involved in fishing would face serious procedural hurdles designed to prevent fishing “detrimental” to the survival of the targeted toothfish species.

Recognizing the benefits of a CITES listing, in 2002, Australia tabled a proposal to list toothfish under Appendix II.  Unfortunately, Australia withdrew this proposal in the face of opposition, and the CITES CoP settled for a “solution” proposed by Chile.  This “solution” requested the CITES parties to adopt and implement the CCAMLR catch document scheme.  Nevertheless, despite the apparent good intentions out of which it emerged, the 2002 compromise has been an absolute disaster.

Now, with this background, we turn to its relevance for the current CITES Conference of the Parties (CoP).  Frustrated by the failure of the 2002 compromise, CCAMLR has submitted a formal plea to the CITES Secretariat to encourage CITES parties involved in the harvest and/or trade of toothfish to adhere to their prior commitments.  In its submission, CCAMLR describes the history of blatant noncompliance with those commitments:

2. In November 2002, the CITES Conference of Parties (CoP12) adopted Resolution 12.4 on ‘Cooperation between CITES and the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Regarding Trade in Toothfish’ and Decisions 12.57 to 12.59 regarding the trade in toothfish.

3. Pursuant to Resolution Conf. 12.4 and Decisions 12.57 and 12.59, Parties to CITES involved in the harvest and/or trade of toothfish are requested to cooperate with CCAMLR’s Catch Documentation Scheme (CDS) for Dissostichus spp. Parties were also requested to report on the implementation of the CDS to the CITES Secretariat and for the information to be communicated to CCAMLR (CCAMLR-XXII, 2003, paragraphs 14.1 and 14.2). This document is submitted in accordance with the abovementioned resolution and decisions.

4. To date, no information has been made available to CCAMLR by the CITES Secretariat pursuant Resolution Conf. 12.4 with regard to the international trade in toothfish.

While supporting CCAMLR’s attempt to rectify this situation, we don’t belive its proposal to the CITES Secretariat goes far enough.  The history described above leads to but one conclusion:  Listing under CITES is absolutely necessary to the long-term survival of toothfish.  The 2002 compromise failed to reign in nations involved in fishing and trading in toothfish.  CITES parties that are not parties to CCAMLR have been given a chance, and they have failed.  For the sake of the toothfish — and for the sake of CITES’ credibility — toothfish species should be proposed for listing at the next CITES CoP.  Sea Shepherd Legal intends to work hard to achieve this goal.

Please support our work at CoP17 with a tax-deductible donation.

Sea Shepherd Legal Lands in South Africa for CITES CoP 17

The Sea Shepherd Legal team has landed in Johannesburg, South Africa, as an official NGO observer of the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).  Over the next two weeks, we will be advocating for greater protection for endangered marine wildlife.  Along the way, we will be posting daily recaps, calls to action, and important developments.

SSL Logo

 

CITES is a global environmental treaty regulating international trade in endangered species.  While trade in elephant ivory and rhino horn grabs many of the headlines, CITES also plays a critical role in trade related to marine wildlife.

Unfortunately, marine species have often receive short shrift under CITES.  This is especially true for species targeted by commercial fisheries, as many parties have insisted that regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs) serve as the proper vehicles for governance.

Yet, it is undisputed that CITES was designed to target trade in all threatened and endangered species.  The treaty makes no distinction between marine and terrestrial wildlife, and the presence of other governance instruments (like RFMOs) neither logically nor legally precludes CITES protection.

Building on the successes of the 16th CoP in Thailand — where the parties agreed to list five species of sharks and all species of manta rays in Appendix II  — Sea Shepherd Legal will be pushing for further listings for marine wildlife.

Proposals this year include the silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis), thresher sharks (Alopias spp.), and devil rays (Mobula spp.), along with nautilus species (Nautilidae spp.) and two species of reef fish (Pterapogon kauderni and Holacanthus clarionensis).

shark-silky-noaa-2

The silky shark is taken in large numbers in target and by-catch fisheries.  By 2013, the proportion of silky fins in the international market had increased to levels as high as 7.47%.

In addition to pushing for the adoption of these proposals — hardly a guaranteed outcome, unfortunately — we will be highlighting the key role of enforcement, including Sea Shepherd’s collaborative efforts with government forces to combat Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fishing, as well as to protect the critically endangered vaquita and totoaba, both of which are listed in CITES Appendix I.

Stay tuned to this blog for updates, and consider making a donation to support our work to leverage CITES in favor of marine wildlife.

 

“Who in the World Would Buy That?” Wildlife Trafficking Leaves Judges Scratching Their Heads — And Species Paying the Price

At this moment the Sea Shepherd Legal team sits in a hall filled with judges, ambassadors, prosecutors, and the leaders of the most critical international conventions that exist.  We all share a common goal:  to ensure that law promotes rather than hinders environmental protection.  The proceedings of the World Environmental Law Congress in Rio de Janeiro have left us feeling empowered.  Meanwhile, events in the Pacific Northwest leave us stunned.

riocongress

This week’s sentencing in United States v. Yeng — where District Judge Robert E. Jones ordered two wildlife traffickers to a trifling $12,500 fine and a mere six months in prison — makes for a sour stew of cognitive dissonance.  While the international community and national authorities endorse the notion that we ought to treat wildlife offenses as serious crimes, sentences like this undermine the global fight against biodiversity loss. High-level declarations, like those accomplished here at the Law Congress, mean nothing if they are not reinforced by meaningful outcomes in individual cases.

What went wrong on Wednesday?   First and most obvious is the simple fact this sentence is woefully inadequate when examined alongside the facts of the case.  The defendants, Eoin Ling Churn Yeng and Galvin Yeo Siang Ann, didn’t just have a momentary lapse of reason.  These men ran a complex smuggling ring for a full decade, marketing parts from critically endangered species, offering everything from orangutan skulls to whale bones.  They peddled their goods through an online store called Borneo Artifact, using PayPal to collect their fees.  And they knew exactly what they were doing, advising buyers to describe the wildlife parts as unsolicited gifts in response to questioning by enforcement agents.

imgp0002jpgjpeg-7374b601b36db99b

 

borneo

The maximum sentence for smuggling illegal wildlife artifacts is five years and a $250,000 fine.  The Yeng defendants walked off with a fraction of that, scoring sentences that topped out at only 1/10 of the maximum available prison time and 1/20 of the maximum available financial penalty.

But why did the judge hand down this insufficient sentence?  Yes, the defendants pleaded guilty, saving the court and prosecutor’s office the significant resources involved in a trial.  Yet this happens in most cases.  There was another dynamic, one that is all too common in wildlife cases:  the court simply failed to grasp the gravity of the defendants’ crimes.

After recounting the various specimens involved, Judge Jones asked one very telling question:  “Who in the world would buy that?”  Think about that for a moment.  Would a judge ask this question when sentencing drug traffickers?  Would this query arise in a case involving human trafficking, gun running, or any other smuggling activity?  In these contexts, judges seem to understand that there is always a buyer for vice, that market demand doesn’t end where the law says it should.

The problem is this:  When judges fail to capture the existence and extent of market demand, they tend to dismiss associated crimes as unimportant.  This in turn leads to lower sentences, sending a signal of apathy that reverberates down the line to prosecutors and enforcement agents.

This presents an enormous challenge for wildlife.  Despite estimates that wildlife trafficking is one of the most lucrative black markets, behind only the trade in drugs, arms, and humans, wildlife crime lags globally in investigations, arrests, and prosecutions.  With their position at the zenith of the justice system, judges have the ability to change all of this for the better.  But judges can’t do that if they don’t understand why these crimes happen and the havoc that they wreak.

Wildlife crime is serious crime.  Judges must begin to see it as such.  Until then, criminals will continue to exploit this soft spot in the criminal justice system.

SSL Logo

To respond to this void, one of Sea Shepherd Legal’s core programs involves providing capacity enhancement for judges, prosecutors and enforcement officials.   We do this globally – to protect the world’s imperiled marine wildlife and habitats.  Please help us continue in this critical work.

 

SSL Backs Effort to Secure ESA Listing for the Oceanic Whitetip

Run a Google search for the oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus), and you’ll be inundated with sites describing how “dangerous” this shark is.  Tales of the whitetip preying on shipwrecked sailors have given it a reputation as a “menace” with a “bad attitude.”  One site, ostensibly dedicated to the dissemination of objective information, analogizes the whitetip to a calculating criminal:  “The oceanic whitetip may only have seven unprovoked attacks and two fatalities on the books, but that’s because it might be getting away with many of its crimes by not leaving any evidence.”

Amidst all the sensationalism, there is a grain of truth:  The oceanic whitetip is associated with crime, violence, and death.  Unfortunately for the shark (and for journalists looking for sexy headlines), the whitetip is the victim, not the perpetrator.

rs_oceanic_whitetip_shark_Joe_Romeiro_5

The oceanic whitetip shark. Photo credit: Joe Romeiro (2010).

As with so many other sharks, the oceanic whitetip is being devastated by the combined forces of targeted shark-fishing (including for the fin trade), by-catch, and habitat degradation.  Population studies reveal an alarming trend:  This most “dangerous” of sharks is being wiped out by people, and it’s happening at a dizzying pace.

In 2006, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) listed the oceanic whitetip as “vulnerable” worldwide.  The IUCN came to this conclusion based on rigorous population studies, finding, inter alia, that the oceanic whitetip had: (1) suffered a population reduction of greater than or equal to 30% over the last 10 years or three generations, and (2) that a population reduction of greater than or equal to 30% was projected or suspected to be met within the next 10 years or three generations based on actual or potential levels of exploitation.  Those are big, frightening numbers — and the problem has only grown worse since the IUCN made its determination in 2006.

The good news is that international and domestic law contain provisions to protect species facing extinction or a threat thereof.  Internationally, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) serves as a bulwark against cross-border trade that exacerbates the risk of extinction.  Domestically, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) provides additional protections.

untitled (7)

In 2013, responding to a proposal co-sponsored by the United States, the Conference of the Parties agreed to list the oceanic whitetip in CITES Appendix II.  Appendix II contains species that are not necessarily now threatened with extinction but that may become so unless trade is closely controlled.  Accordingly, international trade in Appendix II species requires a permit issued by the nation of export.  Under CITES, the exporting nation shall not issue a permit unless it has determined that trade will not be detrimental to survival of the species in the wild.   Although Appendix II protections are not as robust as the protections afforded under Appendix I (which, among other things, requires an import permit in addition to an export permit, building in a second layer of control), the 2013 CITES listing certainly represents progress for the oceanic whitetip.

 untitled (2)

Now it’s time for the ESA to get into the mix.  Although CITES plays a key role in protecting species from threats related to international trade, many of the activities harming the oceanic whitetip fall outside of the CITES framework.  By-catch is perhaps the best example.  If tuna fleets incidentally catch sharks — throwing them back in the water dead or dying, as is usually the case — CITES has little to say about that.  Again, the convention only covers international trade.  Likewise, if nationals of a given country harvest oceanic whitetip for sale in the domestic markets of that same country, CITES is not implicated.  The ESA, on the other hand, starts to pick up the slack, covering  important non-trade-related activities (subject, of course, to jurisdictional limitations).

Good tidings may be on the way:  the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) recently made a positive 90-day finding on a petition to list the oceanic whitetip as endangered or threatened under the ESA.  The petition, filed by Defenders of Wildlife (Defenders), provided overwhelming evidence of the need for listing.  In its  90-day finding, NMFS made the threshold determination that the petition “present[ed] substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action of listing the oceanic whitetip shark worldwide as threatened or endangered may be warranted.”  81 Fed. Reg. at 1385.  The next step is a 12-month finding, wherein NMFS will determine whether listing is in fact warranted.  (Short of a worldwide listing, NMFS could also list “distinct population segments” of the oceanic whitetip.)

In the meantime, Defenders has not let up.  On Monday, Defenders filed comments on the positive 90-day finding, providing new scientific evidence of the whitetip’s plight and a variety of other information to encourage NMFS to make the right call.  Sea Shepherd Legal was honored to join these comments, standing alongside Defenders and several other prominent groups (including Animal Welfare Institute, Center for Biological Diversity, Humane Society International, the Humane Society of the United States, and WildEarth Guardians) to demand protection for this imperiled species.  Please click here to view the comments in their entirety.

To help support our legal work to save sharks and other marine species, please consider making a tax-deductible donation or contacting us for volunteer opportunities (info@seashepherdlegal.org).